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Sunday, August 31, 2014

Sunday's Stories, 52 Ancestor Weeks, Week # 35, Amanda (nee Houghton) Lashbrook

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence


This is week 35 of my participation Amy Johnson Crow's, once a week challenge to blog about one ancestor a week, tell their story, biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on that one ancestor. More about the challenge can be found at her Blog, No Story Too Small.

Amanda Houghton (found spelled Holton and Hotten) was reportedly born February 12, 1833 in Tioga County, Pennsylvania or New York or Michigan, to parents whose identifies remain in question.

There is an Amanda Houghton found on the 1850 US census of Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin, she is living with Anna Houghton 47.  Anna is listed as head of household, value of her real estate is given as $200.00, born in New York; next enumerated is Amanda, age 17, born New York; then listed is Almina age 7, born Michigan.  There is also a carpenter living in the household, a Chas. Payne, age 52, born England.

On November 9, 1852 at Springfield, Dane County, Wisconsin, Amanda Hotten married Aaron Lashbrook. Sadly, many of the questions asked were not answered or filled in on the marriage record found.


Aaron and Amanda (or Mandy as I have found her referred to by distant family members) moved many times during their lives.  That may explain a land patent, dated June 15, 1855 for land in Black Hawk County Iowa, that a Amanda Lashbrook, living in Buchanan County Iowa was awarded.  The patent was for 40 acres of land, the number on this grant is 29667.   (See below for additional information on land patents in this county by Charles and Anna Payne.)

The family was found enumerated on the 1856 State census of Barclay Township, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Aron D. Lashbrook, age 28, born in England, occupation looks to be "horseferries"; Amanda, age 23, born New York; Jacob I or J, age 2, born Wisconsin.  This is the only time we see any recordings for the son Jacob.

Next enumerated in the 1860 census in New Hampton, Chickasaw County, Iowa the family is found as follows: Aaron, age 29, farmer born England; Amanda, age 27 born New York; George, age 3 born Iowa; Albert, age 1 born Iowa.

On the July 1864 IRS Tax lien lists we find "S D Lashbrook", a physician listed in Cedar Falls, Iowa.  Tax due is $10.00.  We are fairly sure this "S D" is actually, A D, however, caution is urged as we cannot be "positively without a doubt" sure.

Amanda and Aaron are enumerated on the 1870 US census of Garden City, Garden City Township, Blue Earth County, Minnesota as follows: Aaron, age 47, farmer, value of real estate $1920., born England; Amanda, age 37, keeping house, born New York; George, age 13, born Iowa; Albert, age 11, born Iowa; Alvin, age 10, born Iowa; Mary Ann, age 3, born Iowa; Myra, age 3, born Iowa.  The agricultural census tells us that they had 52 acres of improved land and 108 acres of other unimproved land, valued at $1920.00, they grew wheat, Irish potatoes, oats, and produced butter.

After moving some more, the family appears in the 1880 US census in Spring Brook, Harlan County, Nebraska as follows: Aaron age 56, "vetneary Sergeon", born NY; Amanda age 46, wife, born NY; Alvin age 20, son laborer, born Iowa; Aretta age 13, daughter, at school, born Iowa; Myron age 13, son, laborer, born Iowa; Dora age 10, daughter, at school, born Minnesota; Chester age 8, son, at school, born Minnesota; Charles age 8, son, at school, born Minnesota; and Ausker (sic-Oscar), age 6, born Iowa.

Five years later, still in Nebraska, the clan is found on the 1885 Census of Prairie Dog Township, Harlan County, Nebraska.  They appear as:  A. Aron Lashbrook, age 57, Veterinary Surgeon, born England, both parents born England; Amanda, age 50, wife, keeping house, born New York, both parents born England; George, age 27, son, farmer, born Iowa [note:  I believe George is also enumerated in Fairfield Township with his wife Nellie, and her son from her first marriage to Melvin Brady, Alva.]; Edwin, age 23, son, farmer, born Iowa; Myron, age 18, son, at home, born Nebraska; Dora, age 15, daughter, servant, born Minnesota; Charles, age 13, son, born Minnesota; Chester, age 13, son, born Minnesota; Oscar, age 8, son, born Illinois.

Amanda and Aaron had 14 children:  Jacob Lashbrook, reported to have died young.  Infant born and died 1855.  George L. Lashbrook.  Albert I. Lashbrook, reportedly died young.  Richard Alvin Lashbrook.  Ada A. Lashbrook, reported by family to have died young, but may be Aretta on the 1880 census.  Myran Aaron Lashbrook. Myra Lashbrook.  Delora E. Lashbrook.  Chares Clinton and Chester C. Lashbrook, reported twins.  Dexter P. Lashbrook, reported to have died young. Oscar Ira Lashbrook. Cora E. Lashbrook, also reported to have died as an infant.

By the 1890's Aaron and Amanda were living in Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kansas.  Extended family and other researchers reported that Aaron had been buried in the Parker Cemetery. No mention of any possible death data or burial information for Amanda was ever made. This was in the days before Find A Grave is what it is today, we were not sure where the Parker Cemetery was.  One family member thought it was in Kay County Oklahoma.  In 2004 Man and I were headed home from a winter in Texas and decided to make a stop in the area.  Within 30 minutes of setting up our Tana in a campground we had been put in touch with a very kind lady who knew where the cemetery was and knew just where Amanda and Aaron were buried.  She met us at the cemetery and shared what she knew about them and other Lashbrooks that were interred there. And, I got a photo!


Amanda's death notice was found in the Tuesday Evening, October 11, 1892 issue of the Arkansas City Daily Traveler, Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kansas, page 5, column 2:
      "Died - - Last evening, on North E. street, of heart disease, Mrs. Amanda Lashbrook, aged 58 years.  The burial took place this afternoon at Parker Cemetery."

Wish list for Amanda Houghton Lashbrook:  Photo.  Names of parents.




* Research notes on possible mother, Anna:

Anna Houghton of Dane County Wisconsin, received on August 1, 1849 a land patent for 40 acres, the patent was signed by President Zachary Taylor.

On January 2, 1852 a marriage index that indicates a marriage between Charles Payn and Anna Houghton too place at Madison, Dane, Wisconsin.  A recent discovery, a copy of the marriage has been requested.

On June 15, 1855, Charles Payne and Anna Payne, both living in Buchanan County, Iowa, are granted land patents in Black Hawk County, Iowa, Charles' is numbered 29665, and Anna's is numbered 29666. They are both for 40 acres, in the same township.  This is the same date as Amanda Lashbrook received a land patent for land in Black Hawk County Iowa.

Charles Payne appears on the 1856 Iowa State Census, of Barclay Township, Black Hawk County, Iowa: Charles Payne, age 54 or 57 (hard to read), married,  has lived in Iowa for one year, born England, wagonmaker, naturalized voter, owns land; Anna Payne, age 54, married, one year in Iowa; Arilla E. Houghton, age 14, in Iowa one year, born Michigan.

In 1860 in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County, Iowa there is a Charles Payne, age 69, farmer, value of real estate is $500, value of personal property is $100., born in England with the following in the household:  Hannah Payne, age 61 (compiler feels she is the same as Anna Hougton from the 1850 census), born New York; Almina Houghton, age 17, born Michigan; Elizabeth Payne, age 12, born Iowa.

Charles, Anna, Almina have not been found after this census.  Elizabeth awaits research. Hopefully rurther research will turn up a hint or two to further this research.

** Additional source data can be obtained by contacting me, see the right hand column for a yahoo email address.

*** 52 Ancestors Weeks Button courtesy of Amy Johnson Crow.

**** I use many resources to research, FamilySearch.org is a free site.  Ancestry.com is a pay site for which I pay, no discounts, etc.  Fold3, is another site I subscribe to and pay for.  None of these sites have asked me to review them, or use them.  See my Disclaimers page for further details.

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Tuesday, August 26, 2014

National Dog Day 2014, Reflection's Fur Kids Family History

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

I hear it is National Dog Day.

Well, alrighty.

We here at Reflections have had a fur kid or two - -

First was Thor, a tri-color collie.


Thor was the most gentle fur kid, Sons # 1 and # 3 could lay all over him and that dog just laid there and took whatever little boys could dish out.  Thor went camping too:


Then came Toto, a yorkiepoo mix.  Man had a distinct dislike for Toto, I loved him.


When it was bitter bitter cold, Thor would be brought inside the house.  He and Toto sleeping by the door.


Then, came the yorkies and our lives have never been the same.

Sebastian.  With his Christmas gift from Man's mother.  A little mouse toy.  He would growl and shake and that mouse was HIS!  We had to hide it!


Benjamin came to us next.  If the bond with Toto was special, the bond with Benjamin was times 3, or 4, or 5.


Years later, somehow we had worked up to being owned by four yorkies.  From left, Gallagher, Chantilly, Captain Hook and Abigail.  I always called this photo "Can We Come in Mommie".


Abigail, Abby, was a royal little girl (you know, that "b" word).  She had Man twisted around all four of her paws.


Chantilly, never met a meal she did not love.  She also loved her stuffed toy bones.  She did have a "pony tail hanging down" and a "pretty face".


Gallagher, aka, Mr. G. OK, he was having a bad bad bad hair day, but, he had Mardi Gras beads!


Captain Hook, aka Cappy, hates his photo taken, I mean he HATES the camera.  Here I managed to catch him as he climbed out of his sleeping (nap) hidey hole in Tana.  And, he was actually looking at me, err, the camera.  Not smiling tho, was he?


Mr. G and Cappy, with Mom, waiting for Dad to buy some new tires in April 2014.  Note, Cappy is looking the opposite way of the iPhone lens.  Figures!


Happy National Dog Day.  Woof Woof!



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Sunday, August 24, 2014

Sunday's Stories, 52 Ancestor Weeks, Week # 34, William Henry Dews

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence


This is week 34 of my participation Amy Johnson Crow's, once a week challenge to blog about one ancestor a week, tell their story, biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on that one ancestor. More about the challenge can be found at her Blog, No Story Too Small.

William Henry Dews was born Jan 25, 1846, probably in Princess Anne County, Virginia to Edward Dews and his wife Mary (whose maiden name is still undiscovered).

I have not found any records (yet) that indicate William served during the Civil War.

On Aug 2, 1870 at Princess Anne County Virginia William married Sarah Williamson.  William and Sarah may have lived in North Carolina for a spell, as their first born, Edmond's (or Edward) death certificate states he was born in North Carolina.  Sarah and William had two children, the aforementioned Edmond/Edward and Lilly May.  Sarah died sometime before October of 1887.

On October 27, 1887 William married Lorena Estelle Eley Norsworthy, a widow, in Norfolk County, Virginia. William and Lorena had 6 children together:  Henry Leroy Dews, Sarah Anne Dews, an unnamed baby boy, Delphine "Della" Dews, Lorena Estelle Dews and Florence Ruth Dews.

The following photo was in the effects (slide collection) of Lorena Estelle Dews Nunnally, my great-aunt, daughter of William and Lorena Dews. She wrote on the slide, "Fluffy was born here, this is the last place we lived."  (Note Fluffy = Florence Ruth Dews).


I inherited a good part of Rena's notes and slides about family.  The following notes were concerning her father:
     "William Henry Dews about 60 years old, died at Saint Vincent De Paul Hospital on Church St (original buildings) about January 1, 1907 (a few days before or after).  I was 6 years old, a week later, Jan 8 1907 and Florence (Fluffy) was 2 years old the previous November 7, 1906.  She is 3 years 10 months younger than me.
     Father fell from a wagon on Christmas Eve on his way home from market, where he and Henry had taken Christmas wreathes and greens that Mama and Sadie had made for market.  He left Henry in charge and started home.
     Some boys had thrown fire crackers under the horse's feet and frightened it.  The wheel went in a hole on Queen Street.  The hole was unlighted-street repairmen had left the hole unlighted.
     He received a concussion and died several days later in the Hospital.  The family (Mama, Sadie and the rest of us) didn't know he was in the hospital for a couple of days.  Henry thought that he had gone home and Mama thought he was still with Henry.  Two or three days later someone told Henry that his father was hurt and in the hospital."

Many research hours were spent trying to verify this story.  Calls to the hospital resulted in the information that the records prior to 1949 had been destroyed.  No death record has been found.  Finally a kind genie angel found this newspaper article, which pretty much verifies Rena's hand written story about her father's demise.


December 28, 1906 issue of the Norfolk Virginia-Pilot:
     "Farmer Dews May Die as Result of a Fall
     W. H. Dews, a farmer, supposedly from Princess Anne county, who fell from his wagon on Christmas day and sustained a fractured skull, is critically ill at St. Vincents hospital, and is not expected to recover.
     At the hospital yesterday it was said that all efforts to locate Dews' relatives had failed."

A search for his burial place has also been very frustrating.  It is fairly clear that William was buried with no marker.  Family shared that they believed he was buried at the Emanuel Episcopal Church, Kempsville, Virginia.  This photo is from the slide collection of Rena Dews Nunnally.  Written on the slide:  "Father buried Xmas 1906 or 07.  October 12, 1943 original - 100 years old - burned. New church 1961."


The church was contacted, they have no record of William being buried there, since the church burned, and presumably all their records with it in 1941, this was no surprise.

Wish list for William:  Photo of William.  Further research for possible Civil War service.




* Additional source data can be obtained by contacting me, see the right hand column for a yahoo email address.

** 52 Ancestors Weeks Button courtesy of Amy Johnson Crow.

*** I use many resources to research, FamilySearch.org is a free site.  Ancestry.com is a pay site for which I pay, no discounts, etc.  Fold3, is another site I subscribe to and pay for.  None of these sites have asked me to review them, or use them.  See my Disclaimers page for further details.

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Sunday, August 17, 2014

Sunday's Stories, 52 Ancestor Weeks, Week # 33, Adam J. Halterman

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence


This is week 33 of my participation Amy Johnson Crow's, once a week challenge to blog about one ancestor a week, tell their story, biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on that one ancestor. More about the challenge can be found at her Blog, No Story Too Small.

Adam J. Halterman was born in 1827 reportedly in Hardy County Virginia (which of course became Hardy County West Virginia).  His parents were George W. Halterman, Sr. and his wife Elizabeth.

Adam married (no record found, yet) Amanda Shiremen (surname found as Sherman in some records) around 1847.

Adam is found on the 1850 US census for the 56th District of Rockingham County, Virginia living near his father George and his brother George.  He is enumerated as follows: Adam, age 25, laborer, born Virginia; Amanda, age 20, born Virginia; George, age 2, born Virginia; Martha, age 6 months, born Virginia.

Adam Halterman is found on the 1860 census enumeration of Mt Clifton District, Shenandoah, Virginia.  Adam is listed as aged 33, born in Virginia, also in the household are Amanda, age 38, born Virginia, George, age 11, born Virginia, Daniel, age 8 born Virginia, Samuel, age 5 born Virginia, Sis, age 3, born Virginia and Rachel age 1, born Virginia.

There is an Adam Halterman listed in the Compiled Service cards for Company C, 97th Virginia Militia, further research may show that this soldier is Adam J., my ancestor.

Adam has not been found on 1870 census indexes, yet.

Adam J Halterman is found on the 1880 census enumeration of Plains, Rockingham, Virginia.  Adam is listed as a 54 year old, born in "Hardy County", Virginia.  Also in the household are Amanda Halterman, Wife, age 52, born Virginia. Selestian Halterman, Son, age 14, born Virginia. Albert Halterman, Son, age 6, born Virginia. David F Halterman, Son. age 11, born Virginia.

The interesting things about this census enumeration is that it states the county name of the birth place and the birth places of the parents.  Also of interest is that Adam is shown having "cancer at lip".  Adam died of cancer two years later.   Here is the 1880 census, image edited for this format.


Adam and Amanda had the following children:  George, Martha, Daniel, Samuel, Elizabeth, Rachael, Selestine, David, Albert.

Adam's record of death reports his birth place as "Brock's Gap".


Wish list for Adam J. Halterman, marriage record, further research time for possible Civil War service.



* Additional source data can be obtained by contacting me, see the right hand column for a yahoo email address.

** 52 Ancestors Weeks Button courtesy of Amy Johnson Crow.

*** I use many resources to research, FamilySearch.org is a free site.  Ancestry.com is a pay site for which I pay, no discounts, etc.  Fold3, is another site I subscribe to and pay for.  None of these sites have asked me to review them, or use them.  See my Disclaimers page for further details.

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Thursday, August 14, 2014

The Old, The New, The Poignant Happy Dance

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

My mother recently shared a small pile of old photos.  There are several real jewels in this little pile of memories and family.  Some I had prior copies, like this one - -

Old, cropped. No doubt fussed with a bit electronically.  In sad shape.


New (no cropping, enhancement and a bit of removal of white spots.)


Photo of my great grandfather, David Halterman; my brother, Donald Eugene Bowen II and, of course, Moi.

We are carrying bags of walnuts.

Family history and documentation has poignant moments, this is one.

Family history and documentation also has moments of pure joy, when we do the "happy dance", this is one.

Photo taken around 1960.




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Monday, August 11, 2014

World War II Transport to, the Titanic? Really??

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

I have been spending some time (OK, a big HUNK o time) transcribing and linking and all things genie for the past few weeks.  It needs to be done, and I have the need to do so.  It is part of attempting to create and maintain balance in my life.  When one part of my interests is ignored for too long I end up in snarky moods (no smart remarks please, we all know about Carol and snarky).

One of the transcription projects was this little book Man's father brought home from World War II.  Here is a scanned image of the cover of the book.  The book is small, just a bit larger than a 3 X 5 index card.  I cropped this pretty close, maybe should redo, with some other object nearby, for size comparison.


As you can see, it is rather worn.

There were 33 pages that were written on, plus 6 additional pages of information on loose papers tucked in here and there.  The handwriting does not appear to be entirely that of Man's father.

Son # 3 is very interested in the study of his grandfather's war experiences, he is the holder of many of Art's war artifacts.  Due to that interest, I have been sharing the transcriptions with him.  He has access to all the scans as well.

Man's father was wounded in World War II.  He spent some time in England hospitalized.  There are references to that part of his war experience. We are particularly interested in page 24 of this little memo book, which states that he left England on the "Santa Rosa", a US hospital ship.

Of course, when I start transcribing and doing input and linking, I have a bit of a tendency (OK, a HUGE tendency) to going chasing shiny things.  It's part of the fun.  Even Son # 3 has been chasing shiny things.

Shiny things found that relate to this project were several web pages.  I am going to provide the links, go ahead, surf about, have a read, then come back.

Wikipedia page on the SS Santa Rosa.  Has a list of war time voyages.  The reference to "June 1945 - Southampton"  fits with the information found in the little book,  which states, in part:

"Arrived Southampton 
1730 13th June and boarded U. S. Hosp 
Ship "Santa Rosa"

Page where the photo (on the above Wikipedia page) of the SS Santa Rosa was found.  Being uncertain of copyright issues, I'll not post the photo here.  It seems the poster is uncertain of authenticity.  That needs to be noted and remembered.

Web page, by Robert Correll, also has a photo of the SS Santa Rosa.  Link provided by World War II researcher, Jennifer Holik.  She writes wonderful books and has a web page too.

Now, son # 3 took this shiny thing research one step further when he discovered this Wikipedia page.  If you don't click on any other links, click on this one, especially if you are into "the strange things in life". Oh, and be VERY sure to look at the poster graphic!  Poster can also be found here!

Done reading?   Interesting stuff, eh? I particularly like this little tidbit:

 "An old Greek ocean liner SS Athinai was converted into a replica of the Titanic."

Now, if you read carefully, you will know that after World War II the "Santa Rosa was renamed Athinai and began a new career as a cruise ship for Typaldos Lines."

And, that my friends is how you go from a World War II transport to the Titanic.  And, that is your shiny stuff for the day!




*Stay tuned for possible further postings on the little book.

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Sunday, August 10, 2014

Sunday's Stories, 52 Ancestor Weeks, Week # 32, Anna Ellen Lashbrook Holt

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence


This is week 32 of my participation Amy Johnson Crow's, once a week challenge to blog about one ancestor a week, tell their story, biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on that one ancestor. More about the challenge can be found at her Blog, No Story Too Small.

Anna Ellen Lashbrook was born November 11, 1922. Church records from St. Louis Parish, Kansas City, Missouri indicate that Anna was adopted. The sponsors for her baptism were John R. and Catherine Lewis, the priest was P. J. Downey.  Anna was christened at the Records of St. Louis Parish, Kansas City, Missouri, on December 10, 1922.  It should be noted that this information was shared with me by another Lashbrook researcher, Michelle, and I do not have copies of the record.  Anna was raised by George William Lashbrook and his wife Gussie Rebbecca (or Rebaka) Hilton.

Little else has been found on Anna's life, marriages, children.  We do find a headstone at the Memorial Park Cemetery, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.  It is my opinion, at this time, that this is her headstone. The headstone is in the same area as her parents, George and Gussie.  On the headstone is also inscribed the name, Christy Franklin.  It is believed that Christy may be a grandchild.  Nothing more is known about Christy.

I took a photo of the headstone when I personally visited the cemetery a number of years ago.


I recently discovered a memorial for a Anna Ellen Holt at Find A Grave.  There is a short obituary/funeral notice on the site, thank you to the contributor for posting the memorial:

"Anna Ellen Holt, 87, Kansas City, passed away December 12, 2009 at Monterey Park Care Center, Blue Springs, MO. Visitation 9-10am Monday December 14, 2009 at the Park Lawn Chapel followed by graveside services at 10am in Memorial Park Cemetery. Arr. Park Lawn Funeral Home 816-523-1234 
Published in Kansas City Star 12-14-09" 

Wish list for Anna:  Further research to prove that this headstone, Find A Grave memorial and funeral notice are indeed for Anna.  Marriage data, who IS Mr. Holt?




* Additional source data can be obtained by contacting me, see the right hand column for a yahoo email address.

** 52 Ancestors Weeks Button courtesy of Amy Johnson Crow.

*** I use many resources to research, FamilySearch.org is a free site.  Ancestry.com is a pay site for which I pay, no discounts, etc.  Fold3, is another site I subscribe to and pay for.  None of these sites have asked me to review them, or use them.  See my Disclaimers page for further details.

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Tuesday, August 5, 2014

It's 4H Fair Time

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

Last week was the local 4H Fair.  The grandtwins participated in their first fair.

We went one day to enjoy the activities.  The day we went was the day they were participating in the "costume" contest.  They dressed the horses and themselves.

Below is D-I-L # 1 with Twin M, and the horse she rides, Thunder.  The parents are not allowed in the stalls and can only "hold" stuff, or maybe "pin" on ID tags.  The girls had to decorate the horses, themselves.


Turned out that everyone thought they had considerable time to "decorate" and "dress", but, that the time frame was not what they thought.  This created a small panic and the grandparents were suddenly found assisting in the "holding" of paints and bags and stuff!

Below, yours truly, holding paint for Twin L and her ride, Arrow.


Twin L saddles up Arrow, she will ride into the arena.


D-I-L # 1 pinning Twin L's "number" to Arrow's saddle blanket.  L was a Ninja (I think??)


Twin M walking Thunder to the arena. M was a fairy.

M and L in the show ring.


Despite the little panic over the misunderstanding of time, the girls did great.  They got the horses decorated/costumed and their own costumes on and into the ring on time!

The grandparents (Man and I) had a great afternoon watching this all unfold and watching the girls with the horses, feeding them, handling them, Twin L had to give Arrow a bath afterwards to remove the paint, they had to clean out stalls (you know the icky stuff).  They sure seemed to be enjoying the entire fair experience.




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Monday, August 4, 2014

Man at Work

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence

Someone (aka, Man) is always teasing me about my techy toys and how many I can be using at one time.

Caught cha dude!  LOL





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Sunday, August 3, 2014

Sunday's Stories, 52 Ancestor Weeks, Week # 31, Graves Niblett

Copyright 2014, CABS for Reflections From the Fence


This is week 31 of my participation Amy Johnson Crow's, once a week challenge to blog about one ancestor a week, tell their story, biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on that one ancestor. More about the challenge can be found at her Blog, No Story Too Small.

Graves Niblett was born, according to a Bible record, July 15, 1824, somewhere near Isle of Wight County, Virginia, possibly Sussex County, Virginia.  (The Bible record was found at the Library of Virginia, Bible printed 1828, Call Number 26261, Title: Niblett family Bible record, 1807-1824. Material: 3 leaves. System Number: 000490057.  You can see the Bible here: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/Bible/26261.pdf )

Graves is found on the 1850 census of Sussex County, Virginia, he is 26 years of age, and is in the household of William H. Niblet and Lucy Niblet.

Graves married Virginia Catherine Eley.  Marriage record, date and place are undiscovered.  SEE BELOW  Their first born son, William was born about 1851.

They had 4 children, William Exum Neblett, Walter Graves Neblett, John Robert Neblett and Solomon Thomas Niblett (yes, I am totally aware there are two spellings here, spelling don't count in genie, eh?).

The family is found on the 1860 U.S. Census, Eastern District, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, Smithfield Post Office:  Graves Niblet, age 36, farmer, value of real estate $3000., value of personal property $2000.; V. C., age 29; Wm. A., age 8; W. G., age 6; Jno R., age 4, A., age 1 (all male children).  (Note that "A" must be the child Solomon, a review of this census image is indicated.)

Graves served during the Civil War in the 16th Virginia Infantry.

From the work, "16th Virginia Infantry" by Benjamin H. Trask,
     "Niblett, Graves:  enlisted March 1, 1862 at Huger Barracks near Norfolk as a Private in CO. D, claimed to be over 35 years old, detached as a guide on the Blackwater River, returned to company, wounded, and captured August 19, 1864 at Davis Farm."  It is interesting to note that Company D is the same unit that Solomon B. Eley, Grave's brother-in-law, served in.
     Trask further tells us:
     "From May 28 to June 23, the 16th Virginia had been involved in half a dozen engagements. The constant marching and fighting made if difficult for company clerks to maintain proper records concerning casualties.. ...."
 
I posted a question about the Davis Farm on the Southampton County Virginia mail list and received this response:
     "The Battle of Davis Farm was one of a series of battles that took place in June of 1864 during the Petersburg Campaign. It was a part of the Weldon R.R. Operations (Jerusalem Plank Road, William's and Davis' Farm). According to the date of your man's capture, he was probably captured during the action at Globe Tavern on 18-21 August 1864 which is sometimes referred to as Weldon R.R.."
     Knox Martin
     SCV Tennessee Division Genealogist

   Reading further in the history of the 16th Virginia, Trask writes:
     "...Grant's next plan was to cut the Weldon and Petersburg Railroad south of the city.  By August 18, Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren's Fifth Corps had invested Globe Tavern and Yellow House...The infantrymen were from Heth's and Mahone's division including the 16th Virginia.
     Warren's corps faced northward and headed to Petersburg.  The day was hot, and muddy footing and the dense forestation terrain made the going slow....
     The engagement of Weldon Railroad (Globe Tavern) had mixed results.  The Confederates bagged more than 2.500 prisoners and inflicted 383 other casualties.  However, the Southerners lost prisoners, two from the 16th Virginia.  The regiment also had twenty-one wounded and one killed."

From resources on the battle, we learn:
Forces Engaged: Corps (34,300 total)
Estimated Casualties: 5,879 total (4,279 US; 1,600 CS)
     Further reading/research that may gain insight would be:
     "The destruction of the Weldon Railroad, Deep Bottom, Globe Tavern, and Reams Station, August 14-25, 1864"  by John Horn, ISBN 1561900109 9781561900107

As a follow up on Grave's war record, I pulled all "Compiled Service record cards" available at Footnote.com., now Fold3, 15 pages in all.  A more complete report on his record is:
     April 30, 1862, he is present an reports that he is over 35 and claims exemption.
     April 30 to October 31, 1862, Absent sick since July 3, 1862.  He was accounted for in Richmond, Virginia on July 3, 1862.
     November & December 1862, January and February 1863, March and April 1863, May and June 1863, he is reported as absent from his unit, but:  detailed by Gen. French as guide near Black Water River.
     July and August 1863, reported as absent, but detailed as a guide in Col. Claybornes Regiment.
     September and October 1863, reported as present in his unit, as he is until:
     July and August 1864, reported as absent, captured and wounded since August 19th.

No death record for Graves was found in the Isle of Wight County Virginia death records.

There is a Chancery Case concerning Graves Niblett, it is found at the Virginia Memory:Library of Virginia web site.  There are 180 pages in the case.  I have copied 132 to my hard drive.  For the most part this resource has not been utilized, the documents are not transcribed, nor even linked to the data base, YET!

So far, the earliest date on the documents reviewed in the Chancery case would seem to indicate that Graves had died sometime before the 27th of March 1866.  I have glanced at many of these pages and have yet to find a death date indicated, always just a reference to Graves Niblett, deceased.  (Yes, you hear a long sigh from me, in 180 pages, no one thought to include the death date??)

This document, a promissory note, dated 1859, seems to have his signature:


Wish list for Graves, find marriage, death and burial information.  Process the Chancery Case documents (which I just know will lead to further research on his clan, siblings, children, etc.)

I have written about Virginia, his wife, three times here on Reflections, Tombstone Tuesday, Virginia C. WatkinsLet One Brick Wall Crack, and most recently, Oh, V.C. Or, How I Hate Initials.  




* Additional source data can be obtained by contacting me, see the right hand column for a yahoo email address.

** 52 Ancestors Weeks Button courtesy of Amy Johnson Crow.

*** I use many resources to research, FamilySearch.org is a free site.  Ancestry.com is a pay site for which I pay, no discounts, etc.  Fold3, is another site I subscribe to and pay for.  None of these sites have asked me to review them, or use them.  See my Disclaimers page for further details.

**** Thanks to genie angel and friend AM, the marriage data has come to light, this is from the Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940 data base at FamilySearch.org, available on film # 31998, reference number: p 523.


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